8/9 From Here to Eternity (Play on Film)

160 Minutes, with 15 minute interval 

BUY TICKETS: Sunday, August 9, 2015 @ 3 p.m.

Pearl Harbor, 1941, where the girls sing “don’cha like Hawaii”, the men of G Company sing the blues, and where even on an army base, love and desire are never very far away. When the troubled Private Prewitt falls for the kind hearted escort club girl Lorene, and when his platoon sergeant, Warden, embarks on a dangerous affair with his commanding officer’s wife, Karen, the lives of both men are set on a course they cannot control.

FHTE 6

As war approaches, the worlds of the four lovers and the soldiers of G Company are dramatically ripped apart. Sir Tim Rice’s magnificent new musical From Here To Eternity is adapted from one of the greatest novels of the twentieth century; a gripping tale of illicit love and army life which translates in to a breath-taking, romantic and excitingly original show, set to join the front rank of great musicals.

10/11 The Children of Willesden Lane

PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SAJE (Seminars for Adult Jewish Enrichment) AND THE HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTER.

BUY TICKETS: Sunday, October 11 @ 2 p.m. 

 Set in Vienna in 1938 and London during the Blitzkrieg, The Children of Willesden Lane is directed by Hershey Felder. It tells the true story of Lisa Jura, a young Jewish pianist who dreams of a concert debut at the storied Musikverein concert hall.showimage13028

When Lisa is swept up in the Kindertransport to protect her from the Nazi regime, everything about her life is upended except her love of music and her pursuit of that dream.

Mona Golabek, Lisa Jura’s daughter, tells her mother’s story and performs some of the world’s most beloved piano music in this poignant tribute to her remarkable mother.Mona Golabek performing

Based on the book The Children of Willesden Lane, written by Mona Golabek and Lee Cohen, The Pianist of Willesden Lane is one young girl’s story of survival and how the most beautiful music in the world saved her life.

Los Angeles Times
“[The Play]  is an arresting, deeply affecting triumph. …an undiluted privilege to witness.”

248.661.1900